How to drink tea correctly.

Make the tea how you like it. And then drink it.

That’s it.

Many teas come with instructions that tell you what temperature to heat the water to and how long to steep the tea. These can be very useful, when I am trying a new tea for the first time I always follow the instructions because it gives me a good starting point to go from, and in general tea vendors want you to like their tea so you will buy more of it in future so following the instructions, especially if it is a tea you have never tried before is a good way to get the best out of the leaves. Then if I like the tea I will keep following the instructions whereas if the tea doesn’t quite meet my personal flavour preferences I will mess around with the temperature and brewing time and experiment until it does (for example I tend to brew white teas for several minutes longer than I am “supposed to” because I enjoy the stronger taste).

You will also find people saying you should never use teabags or you should never put anything in your tea except water. I have my own opinions on this and will be publishing another post later about why I prefer loose leaf but at the end of the day as the person drinking the tea it is completely up to you.

Tea is the most commonly drunk beverage in the world (after water) and many cultures have completely different ideas what “tea” is. If you ask for “tea” with no further specification in Great Britain (where I come from) you will get black tea in a tea bag (most commonly Assam or Ceylon) and the offer of milk or sugar. Whereas when I lived in Japan the request for “tea” would instead result in being given a cup of a green tea (most commonly Sencha) with no offer of milk or sugar (because green tea doesn’t tend to taste good with milk or sugar). These two countries have completely different ideas of what “tea” is. Yet even within cultures there is a huge variety of preferences, I have known British people who drink tea with no milk, with sugar, with no sugar, with cream, with lemon. Or Japanese people who steep the leaves (or tea bag no everyone in Japan does the tea ceremony all the time or even uses loose leaf tea) for far longer than I personally would to make a stronger liquor, and I have only gone into the most common two types of tea in two countries I have spent most time in.

When you factor in the other 193 countries in the world and all the other thousands of teas (excluding blends which would make the number a lot higher) the different ways of having tea become almost infinite.

The simple fact is if you like the taste of the tea you are drinking you are making it correctly.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s